Orthodontic Info and FAQs at Bedont Orthodontics
Early Treatment
 

Orthodontic Info & FAQs

Early Treatment

When is the best time to begin orthodontics?

Though an orthodontist can enhance a smile at any age, there is an optimal time period to begin treatment. Beginning treatment at the right time ensures the greatest results and the least amount of time and expense. Dr. Bedont and the American Association of Orthodontists recommend that the initial orthodontic evaluation should occur at the first sign of orthodontic problems or no later than age 7. At this early age, orthodontic treatment may not be necessary, but vigilant examination can anticipate the most advantageous time to begin treatment. Get the resource guide "Braces at 7?!" here.

What are the benefits of early orthodontic treatment?

Early evaluation provides both timely detection of problems and greater opportunity for more effective treatment. Prudent intervention can help guide growth and development, preventing more serious problems later. When early orthodontic intervention is not necessary, Dr. Bedont can carefully monitor growth and development and begin treatment when it is ideal.

Why is age 7 considered the optimal time for screening?

By the age of 7, the first adult molars have erupted, establishing the back bite. During this time, we can evaluate front-to-back and side-to-side tooth relationships. Also, adult teeth are in the process of erupting and can be monitored for any potential problems in eruption sequence or timing. Some problems, when detected and corrected early through interceptive care, will allow for normal growth and development and will reduce or eliminate time in orthodontic treatment during adolescence.

 

Typical signs of the need for an orthodontic exam may include, but are not limited to the early or late loss of teeth, difficulty in chewing, mouth-breathing, finger sucking, crowded teeth, jaw dysfunction, a small or protruding jaw, or misaligned teeth. Other signs of potential orthodontic problems may not be obvious. Our exam is complimentary and is the most sensible means of ensuring proper oral health.

Interceptive Care

Interceptive care refers to orthodontic treatment at an age before all of the permanent teeth have erupted. This typically at occurs between the ages of 7 and 9. We can often correct major problems with occlusion such as crossbites or severe skeletal structural issues, as well as incisor alignment, when they are causing emotional distress at this age. Interceptive care is often called Phase I treatment because early treatment doesn't always eliminate the need for future orthodontic treatment, but can make subsequent treatment (Phase II) shorter and more predictable, ensuring better results.

What are the advantages of interceptive treatment?

  • Correcting crossbites that could otherwise lead to a damaging bite and/or disruption of normal growth and development

  • Creating facial symmetry through influencing jaw growth

  • Creating room for crowded, erupting teeth

  • Preserving space for unerupted teeth

  • Reducing the need for tooth removal

  • Reducing treatment time in braces

 
Adolescent Treatment

A healthy smile is a confident smile and we believe that every child deserves the opportunity to smile with confidence. 

Orthodontic treatment from Dr. Bedont will provide your pre-teen or teenager with the opportunity to feel good about themselves and smile with confidence.

 

Orthodontics is more than straightening crooked teeth. An overbite, an underbite, a dysfunctional smile, and a small or protruding chin all can be corrected with orthodontic treatment. Proper tooth and jaw alignment are critical to achieving long-term oral health.

We feel that treatment at this time, particularly during the adolescent growth spurt, provides us with the greatest opportunity to achieve the best result. Adolescent youth are searching for their identity and their way in life, so treating at this time also allows us to provide encouragement and guidance as they mature.

 

Teen-Invisalign, traditional braces, or clear braces are all options we can review together. 

Typical teen and adult issues

that greatly benefit from orthodontic treatment. 

 

After orthodontic treatment, patients report improved confidence and self-esteem that results in improved relationships and career success.

Read patient testimonials here.

 

Adult Treatment

Braces aren't just for kids anymore.

Actually, a large percentage of our patients are adults, and they agree that it's never too late to improve their greatest asset - their smile. Tooth alignment can be changed at any age if your gums and bone structure are healthy.

Clear braces as well as Invisalign are popular options for many adults. Check out our Invisalign special here 

 

Orthodontic treatment as an adult can dramatically improve your personal appearance and self-esteem. Improving the health of your teeth and gums is equally important. Crooked teeth and a bad bite can contribute to gum and bone loss, tooth decay, abnormal wear of the tooth enamel and surfaces, headaches, and jaw joint (TMJ/TMD) pain. Teeth provide the support structure for the soft tissue of the lower face, including lips, cheeks, and marionette lines. By repositioning the teeth and jaw, skin can appear tighter and lips can appear fuller. We can often achieve greater facial aesthetics without surgery or the extraction of teeth by creating a treatment plan utilizing appliances that can expand the jaw and reposition teeth and gums.

 

Great news! The new techniques and appliances we use today greatly increases comfort levels, decreases the frequency of visits, shortens treatment time, and may allow you to choose from several different options. You options may include clear braces, metal braces, or transparent aligners that can be worn to improve mild cases of misaligned teeth.

 

During your initial consultation visit, Dr. Bedont will do a full examination of your bit and teeth position to determine the best possible treatment for your individual needs. During this visit we will outline your treatment plan, expected time of treatment, and cover fees and insurance coverage.

Extractions

While modern orthodontics allows for more people to be treated without extraction of permanent teeth, occasionally extractions are still the best solution to an orthodontic problem. Our office's treatment philosophy is very conservative, and we make every effort to avoid extraction. We treat to balance facial aesthetics and function, and if those goals are best achieved with extractions, we will recommend extractions.

 
 
Orthognathic Surgery

Just as orthodontics repositions teeth, orthognathic surgery corrects jaw irregularities to improve the patient's ability to chew, speak, and breathe and for improved facial appearances. In other words, orthognathic surgery straightens your jaw. Moving the jaws also moves the teeth, so braces are always performed in conjunction with jaw correction. This helps make sure teeth are in their proper positions after surgery.

Who needs orthognathic surgery?

Orthognathic surgery may be unnecessary if orthodontic treatment can correct the problem. With the latest advances in orthodontics, this is sometimes the case. We will help you determine if orthognathic surgery is the right treatment option for you. If so, Dr. Bedont is experienced with the orthodontics required for this surgery and will work closely with your surgeon to ensure the best possible results.

 

Dr. Bedont will consider surgical orthodontic treatment for non-growing adult patients and teenagers with improper bites, and those with facial aesthetic concerns. Growth of the jaws must be completed before jaw surgery can be performed. However, the pre-surgical tooth movements can begin before completion of growth. Dr. Bedont will help determine the best time to begin orthodontic treatment in preparation for orthognathic surgery.

How does it work?

During your orthodontic treatment, which usually lasts 12-24 months, you wear braces and will visit Dr. Bedont for scheduled adjustments to your braces. As your teeth move with the braces, you may think that your bite is getting worse rather than better. However, when your jaws are placed into proper alignment during orthognathic surgery, the teeth will then fit into their proper positions. We look at it as taking one step back to take 4 steps forward.

 

Surgery is performed in the hospital by an oral surgeon and can take several hours, depending on the amount and type of surgery needed. The most common procedure to move the lower jaw is a bilateral sagital split osteotomy (BSSO). In this surgery, the jawbone behind the teeth is separated and the tooth-bearing portion is moved forward or backward, as needed. The most common procedure to move the upper jaw is the LeFort osteotomy. In this surgery, the upper jaw can be repositioned forward, or the jaw can be raised or lowered. Certain movements may require the upper jaw to be separated, with bone added or removed to achieve the proper alignment and stability. Other facial bones that contribute to alignment may also be repositioned or augmented.

When you have completed surgery, you should be able to return to school or work within two weeks. After the necessary healing time (about 4-8 weeks), 

 

Dr. Bedont will "fine-tune" your bite. In most cases, braces are removed within 6 to 12 months following surgery. After your braces are removed, you will wear a retainer to maintain your beautiful new smile.

       What is Orthodontics?

Orthodontics is the branch of dentistry that specializes in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of dental and facial irregularities. The technical term for these problems is "malocclusion," which means "bad bite." The practice of orthodontics requires professional skill in the design, application and control of corrective appliances, such as braces, to bring teeth, lips and jaws into proper alignment, thus achieving facial balance.

   

       What Causes Orthodontic Problems?

Most malocclusions are inherited, and some are acquired. Inherited problems include crowding of teeth, too much space between teeth, extra teeth, congenitally missing teeth and a wide range of discrepancies involving the jaws, teeth and face. Acquired problems can be caused by trauma, thumb or finger sucking, airway obstruction by tonsils and adenoids, dental diseases and premature loss of baby or adult teeth. Many of these problems affect not only alignment of the teeth but facial development and appearance as well.

 

       At What Age Should My Child See an Orthodontist?

The American Association of Orthodontics recommends that your child be evaluated by age 7. An orthodontic screening no later than this enables us to detect and evaluate problems that exist, advise the parent on whether treatment will be necessary, and determine the best time for any treatment. Early detection of orthodontic problems is important so that early corrective action can be taken and more difficult treatment later can be avoided.

 

       What is the Duration of Orthodontic Treatment?

Braces may be on between 6 months to 30 months, or in rare instances longer. This depends on the development of the dentition, the severity of the problem, the patient's cooperation and the degree of tooth movement required.

 

      Is Orthodontic Care Expensive?

When orthodontic treatment is implemented at the proper time, treatment is often less costly than the dental care required to treat the more serious problems that can develop years later. Orthodontic fees have not increased as fast as the costs for many other consumer products. Financing is usually available, and our office offers many payment programs.

      What is an Orthodontist?

An orthodontist is a dental specialist in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of dental and facial irregularities. Orthodontists must first attend college, then complete a four-year graduate dental program at a university-level dental school accredited by the American Dental Association (ADA). They must then complete an additional two- to three-year residency program of advanced dental education in orthodontics accredited by the ADA. Only dentists who have completed this advanced specialty education may become orthodontists.

 

       How Do I Know If My Child Needs Orthodontic Treatment?

It is usually difficult for you to determine whether treatment is necessary because many problems can occur even though the front teeth look straight. Also, some problems that look intimidating and complex will resolve on their own. Your general dentist is a good reference, but we are your best resource because orthodontics is all we do. Our initial exam is comprehensive and informative, and we would be more than happy to see your child and make any recommendations necessary.

 

      Is Orthodontic Treatment Painful?

Orthodontic treatment has improved dramatically. As a rule, braces make your teeth tender and sore for a few days, but are not painful. This annoyance can be relieved with an over-the-counter analgesic. Today's braces are more comfortable and use technology that reduces the any irritation. We use the latest in biocompatible braces, the advanced technique with light force and the highest quality orthodontic materials in order to reduce discomfort and treatment time.

 

      What is the Difference Between Extraction and Non-Extraction Therapies?

Each treatment is a way to address crowding of the teeth. Extraction therapy is a technique in which one or more teeth are removed to make room for the other teeth in the mouth. This is in contrast to non-extraction therapy, in which the patient's jaw is expanded and/or the shape and size of some teeth are adjusted to make them fit within the jaw. Our office's treatment philosophy is very conservative, and we do make every effort to avoid extraction. However, for severe crowding, severe jaw discrepancy, or to achieve good facial balance, extraction may be required.

      Can Adults Have Braces?

Age is not a factor in considering orthodontic treatment. Any adult in good general health with healthy gums and good bone support for the teeth is a good candidate for orthodontic treatment. About 25% of our orthodontic patients are adults, and that number is still growing!

 

       What are the Early Signs Of Orthodontic Problems?

Although you may find it difficult to determine whether treatment is necessary, the following signs can help in prompting you to seek orthodontic advice: crowded or overlapping teeth; gaps between the teeth; poor alignment of front top teeth with bottom teeth; top front teeth that do not meet with the bottom teeth; and top front teeth that cover more than 50% of the bottom teeth. If you see any misalignment or shifting of the jaw, your child may have a skeletal problem that could require early orthodontic treatment.

 

      Does Everyone Need Phase I Treatment?

Not every child needs Phase I treatment. Only some children with certain bites require early intervention. All others can wait until most if not all their permanent teeth erupt. However, it is important that every child be evaluated by age 7.

 

      What are Phase I (Interceptive) and Phase II (Comprehensive) Treatments?

Phase I or Interceptive Treatment usually starts about age 7 to 9, when the child has most of his or her baby teeth and a few permanent front incisors. The goal of Phase I treatment is to intercept moderate or severe orthodontic problems early in order to reduce or eliminate them. These problems include skeletal discrepancies, crossbites, and severe crowding. Phase I treatment takes advantage of the early growth spurt and turns a difficult orthodontic problem into a more manageable one. This often helps reduce the need for extraction or surgery and delivers better long-term stability. Most Phase I patients require a second phase of treatment in order to achieve an ideal final bite.

Phase II treatment usually occurs a number of years later. Usually, we wait for the remaining permanent teeth to erupt, including second molars, before beginning Phase II. This most commonly occurs at the age of 12 or 13. The goal of Phase II treatment is to achieve an ideal bite with all of the permanent teeth.

 

       What is Orthodontics?

Orthodontics is the branch of dentistry that specializes in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of dental and facial irregularities. The technical term for these problems is "malocclusion," which means "bad bite." The practice of orthodontics requires professional skill in the design, application and control of corrective appliances, such as braces, to bring teeth, lips and jaws into proper alignment, thus achieving facial balance.

   

       What Causes Orthodontic Problems?

Most malocclusions are inherited, and some are acquired. Inherited problems include crowding of teeth, too much space between teeth, extra teeth, congenitally missing teeth and a wide range of discrepancies involving the jaws, teeth and face. Acquired problems can be caused by trauma, thumb or finger sucking, airway obstruction by tonsils and adenoids, dental diseases and premature loss of baby or adult teeth. Many of these problems affect not only alignment of the teeth but facial development and appearance as well.

 

       At What Age Should My Child See an Orthodontist?

The American Association of Orthodontics recommends that your child be evaluated by age 7. An orthodontic screening no later than this enables us to detect and evaluate problems that exist, advise the parent on whether treatment will be necessary, and determine the best time for any treatment. Early detection of orthodontic problems is important so that early corrective action can be taken and more difficult treatment later can be avoided.

 

       What is the Duration of Orthodontic Treatment?

Braces may be on between 6 months to 30 months, or in rare instances longer. This depends on the development of the dentition, the severity of the problem, the patient's cooperation and the degree of tooth movement required.

 

      Is Orthodontic Care Expensive?

When orthodontic treatment is implemented at the proper time, treatment is often less costly than the dental care required to treat the more serious problems that can develop years later. Orthodontic fees have not increased as fast as the costs for many other consumer products. Financing is usually available, and our office offers many payment programs.

FAQ's

      What is an Orthodontist?

An orthodontist is a dental specialist in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of dental and facial irregularities. Orthodontists must first attend college, then complete a four-year graduate dental program at a university-level dental school accredited by the American Dental Association (ADA). They must then complete an additional two- to three-year residency program of advanced dental education in orthodontics accredited by the ADA. Only dentists who have completed this advanced specialty education may become orthodontists.

 

       How Do I Know If My Child Needs Orthodontic Treatment?

It is usually difficult for you to determine whether treatment is necessary because many problems can occur even though the front teeth look straight. Also, some problems that look intimidating and complex will resolve on their own. Your general dentist is a good reference, but we are your best resource because orthodontics is all we do. Our initial exam is comprehensive and informative, and we would be more than happy to see your child and make any recommendations necessary.

 

      Is Orthodontic Treatment Painful?

Orthodontic treatment has improved dramatically. As a rule, braces make your teeth tender and sore for a few days, but are not painful. This annoyance can be relieved with an over-the-counter analgesic. Today's braces are more comfortable and use technology that reduces the any irritation. We use the latest in biocompatible braces, the advanced technique with light force and the highest quality orthodontic materials in order to reduce discomfort and treatment time.

 

      What is the Difference Between Extraction and Non-Extraction Therapies?

Each treatment is a way to address crowding of the teeth. Extraction therapy is a technique in which one or more teeth are removed to make room for the other teeth in the mouth. This is in contrast to non-extraction therapy, in which the patient's jaw is expanded and/or the shape and size of some teeth are adjusted to make them fit within the jaw. Our office's treatment philosophy is very conservative, and we do make every effort to avoid extraction. However, for severe crowding, severe jaw discrepancy, or to achieve good facial balance, extraction may be required.

      Can Adults Have Braces?

Age is not a factor in considering orthodontic treatment. Any adult in good general health with healthy gums and good bone support for the teeth is a good candidate for orthodontic treatment. About 25% of our orthodontic patients are adults, and that number is still growing!

 

       What are the Early Signs Of Orthodontic Problems?

Although you may find it difficult to determine whether treatment is necessary, the following signs can help in prompting you to seek orthodontic advice: crowded or overlapping teeth; gaps between the teeth; poor alignment of front top teeth with bottom teeth; top front teeth that do not meet with the bottom teeth; and top front teeth that cover more than 50% of the bottom teeth. If you see any misalignment or shifting of the jaw, your child may have a skeletal problem that could require early orthodontic treatment.

 

      Does Everyone Need Phase I Treatment?

Not every child needs Phase I treatment. Only some children with certain bites require early intervention. All others can wait until most if not all their permanent teeth erupt. However, it is important that every child be evaluated by age 7.

 

      What are Phase I (Interceptive) and Phase II (Comprehensive) Treatments?

Phase I or Interceptive Treatment usually starts about age 7 to 9, when the child has most of his or her baby teeth and a few permanent front incisors. The goal of Phase I treatment is to intercept moderate or severe orthodontic problems early in order to reduce or eliminate them. These problems include skeletal discrepancies, crossbites, and severe crowding. Phase I treatment takes advantage of the early growth spurt and turns a difficult orthodontic problem into a more manageable one. This often helps reduce the need for extraction or surgery and delivers better long-term stability. Most Phase I patients require a second phase of treatment in order to achieve an ideal final bite.

 

Phase II treatment usually occurs a number of years later. Usually, we wait for the remaining permanent teeth to erupt, including second molars, before beginning Phase II. This most commonly occurs at the age of 12 or 13. The goal of Phase II treatment is to achieve an ideal bite with all of the permanent teeth.

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503.665.1115

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